FIFA Anticipates 5 Billion Viewers for World Cup 2022

FIFA president Gianni Infantino recently stated in an interview that 5 billion individuals all over the globe are anticipated to tune in to watch the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. An unprecedented 3.5 billion people watched the 2018 World Cup in Russia on television.

Beginning in late November, Qatar, a small but affluent Gulf Arab state, will host the very first FIFA tournament ever held in the Middle East. On Monday, the country’s Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, condemned attacks on Qatar because it is hosting the event.

Qatar amidst controversies and criticisms

According to Emir’s remarks at the World Economic Forum, there are still those who refuse to believe that an Arab Muslim nation could host a tournament of such magnitude.

He acknowledged that Qatar, like many other countries, was “not ideal,” but praised the country for its efforts to reform and advance. Authorities say the new regulations, which include a higher minimum salary, are meant to safeguard workers from things like heat stress.

Human rights organizations have harshly criticized Qatar’s management of migrant workers and other foreigners, who make up the vast majority of the country’s population. Famous soccer players and coaches like England’s Gareth Southgate have voiced worry over the human rights of some supporters heading to Qatar, particularly women and LGBT+ fans.

In Qatar, being gay is against the law and some women are even restricted from marrying, holding government employment, or traveling internationally without the consent of a male relative, which raises concerns about their standing.

While encouraging supporters not to engage in public displays of affection, tournament organizers emphasize that all visitors, regardless of sexual orientation or origin, are welcome in Qatar.

Qatar has refuted allegations made in a 2021 report by Amnesty International claiming that over a thousand migrant workers continue to be mistreated, saying that its employment system is still being developed.

Viewership projections

President Sepp Blatter of FIFA has predicted that 5 billion individuals will watch the World Cup in Qatar this year. This doesn’t even include the number of people who would opt for a free World Cup 2022 livestream instead.

It will be the first World Cup to be held in the Middle East and, because of the region’s blistering summer heat, it would be the first-ever World Cup to be held over the winter months. The event has been mired in controversy over issues ranging from funding to human rights abuses.

FIFA president Gianni Infantino predicted at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, that the forthcoming event will draw more viewers than the equally divisive 2018 World Cup in Russia (3.5 billion).

Recently, Amnesty International demanded that FIFA allocate US$440 million to pay migrant workers in Qatar for alleged “human rights abuses” committed by the country in preparation for the World Cup, allegations that Qatar has consistently denied.

The nonprofit organization and other rights organizations wrote to Infantino to urge the governing body to cooperate with member associations in the future for the sake of protecting migrant workers.

Sustainability Credentials for the Qatar World Cup

The World Cup in Qatar will be unlike any other in part because of its effect on the local ecosystem. Even if you’re among the ones who chose to watch the World Cup 2022 livestream at home, it’s good to know that even after the event is over, several of the stadiums will be dismantled and turned into parks for the residents to enjoy.

The tournament’s stadiums, including the ones that will remain standing after the event, were built using recycled materials from demolished buildings. All of the stadiums are currently installing recycling facilities.

According to Bodour Al-Meer, the sustainability director in charge of the World Cup’s logistics, the country’s sustainability program will offer both a wonderful FIFA World Cup and real progress toward our national 2030 objectives and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

At the Plastics Conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, she talked to delegates from the Gulf Petrochemicals Association and asked them to work with Qatar to make the 2022 World Cup plastic-free. She went on to say that if we can harness sports’ influence to promote sustainability, it could be the sport’s greatest victory in history.

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