Science

Greatest Scientist in the 19th Century

The 19th century witnessed the beginning of modern science. The old term philosopher was replaced by the word scientist in 1833 by William Whewell. There are a lot of influential ideas and innovative inventions that emerged in the 19th century and among those were  Charles Darwin’s “The Origin of Species” which introduced the idea of evolution by natural selection. Other significant discoveries were the first vaccine against rabies, the creation of the periodic table of elements, and the creation of electromagnetism as a new branch of science. But all of these great innovations and discoveries would not be possible without the brilliant minds behind them.

1. Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla
Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was a Serbian-American inventor. He is best known for his development of alternating current electrical systems and his most popular invention was the Tesla Coil which is a circuit that transforms energy to extremely high voltage charges that create powerful electrical fields that is capable of producing electrical arcs. Tesla was also the one who pioneered the development of x-ray technology, radar technology, and the rotating magnetic field.

2. Marie Curie

Marie Curie
Marie Curie

Marie Curie was a Polish chemist and physicist. She was the one responsible for coining the term and theorizing the concept radioactivity. She also discovered the elements polonium and radium and she founded techniques for isolating radioactive isotopes. Marie Curie was the first woman that won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

3. Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin was an English naturalist and biologist. He is best known for his contributions to the science of evolution which changed the world’s outlook at the creation of life. He was also the first person to establish the concept that all species descended from common ancestors and that it creates a branching pattern of evolution. He called this process the natural selection.

4. Alexander Graham Bell

Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell

Alexander Graham Bell was a Scottish engineer, scientist, innovator, and inventor. He is most famous for developing the telephone where he worked with his assistant, Thomas Watson. He also worked on the refinement of the phonograph. Alexander Graham Bell held a total of eighteen patents under his name and another twelve patents which he shared with collaborators.

5. Gregor Mendel

Gregor Mendel
Gregor Mendel

Gregor Mendel was an Austrian scientist who is hailed as the father of modern genetics because for his pioneering research in the field of heredity. He has done extensive analysis and experimentationwhere he founded the three principles of inheritance, the law of dominance, the law of segregation, and the law of independent assortment. Mendel also developed the concepts of recessive and dominant genes which explainhow genetic traits can be passed along generation to generation.

6. Louis Pasteur

Louis Pasteur
Louis Pasteur

Louis Pasteur was a French microbiologist, chemist, and biologist who is known to be the first person who developed the first vaccines for anthrax and rabies. He is also the one who invented the technique of treating wine and milk to stop bacterial contamination in a process called “pasteurization” which is named after him. And this process is still widely used today in the food industry.

7. Alfred Nobel

Alfred Nobel
Alfred Nobel

Alfred Nobel was a Swedish businessman, inventor, chemist, and engineer. Throughout his career, Alfred Nobel obtained a total of 355 patents. He is famous for inventing dynamite and developing more powerful detonators and explosives to effectively ignite them. He also established almost a hundred factories all over the world to produce explosives which made him one of the wealthiest persons in the world. Alfred Nobel doesn’t have a wife or any children that’s why when he died, he left most of his wealth for the establishment of the Nobel Prize.

8. Alexander Fleming

Alexander Fleming
Alexander Fleming

Alexander Fleming was a Scottish microbiologist, pharmacologist, and physician. He is popular for creating antibiotic medicines and his discovery of the penicillin. His discoveries helped mankind in treating certain diseases and bacterial infections. Alexander Fleming won a Nobel Prize in Physiology in 1945 for his breakthrough discovery.

9. Dmitri Mendeleev

Dmitri Mendeleev
Dmitri Mendeleev

Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian inventor and chemist who is best known for formulating the Periodic Law and successfully organizing the elements into the periodic table.

Tags

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker