60s Music

History of Janis Joplin

Janis Joplin
Publicity photo from photo session of Janis Joplin. (Source: Wikipedia)

A summary of her short life and career

Janis Joplin may have died at a young age of 27, but musically she sounded wise beyond her years. The variety of influences she had absorbed provided her with a distinct musical and vocal personality she could very well call her own, and her electrifying stage presence as well as her outspoken demeanor redefined the women’s role in the world of rock music. Joplin was also a great force in the San Francisco and psychedelic music scene, having graced the Monterey Pop Festival and the Woodstock Festival. Whenever you recall these events and such musical phenomena, it’s impossible not to also think of Janis Joplin. Her short life and career would create a long lasting influence which is still felt among later generations of rock musicians and fans.

 

Rock goddess forever

Janis Joplin was born in Port Arthur, Texas on January 19, 1943. While growing up, she found it difficult to fit in into the conservative norms of society, eventually becoming an outcast and developing a rebellious behavior. She found solace in art and especially music. She had been singing blues and folk while she was in her high school years.

She was about 20 years old when she left Texas for San Francisco, California, hooking up with future Jefferson Airplane guitarist Jorma Kaukonen. Joplin settled in California permanently, later joining a struggling psychedelic rock group called Big Brother & the Holding Company. Joplin eventually led the band to their breakthrough performance at the Monterey Pop Festival.

The band’s eponymous debut album was released on Mainstream Records in 1967. It spawned three minor hit singles “Blindman,” “Bye, Bye Baby,” and the #43 hit “Down on Me.” The band was then signed to Columbia records and released their second album Cheap Thrills, in 1967 (or 1968). It topped the Billboard 200, spurred by the now ­classic rock single “Piece Of My Heart” which peaked at #12.

 

Joplin felt she was ready to strike out on her own, and so she left Big Brother & Holding Company to launch a solo career. She formed a new backup band, the Kozmic Blues Band, and released her first solo effort Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! in 1969. It was a success but critics felt that it wasn’t her best work. However, the album did feature one of her signature songs “Try (Just A Little Bit Harder).”

Whenever her musical directions and her own career were on the rise, her personal matters were otherwise were in shambles. This was made worse by her alcoholism and drug addiction as well as her failed relationships with both men and women.

She formed another backing band the Full Tilt Boogie Band, which was more cohesive and more musically versatile, compared to the Kozmic Blues Band. With them, Joplin recorded what was to be her final album, Pearl, which further showcased her maturity as an artist.

Tragically, things ended for Joplin when she died at a Hollywood hotel in October 1970 of heroin overdose. She was only 27 years old. Her death devastated her fans and her peers in the music industry. They were already reeling since the death of another rock legend Jimi Hendrix just a few days earlier (he was also 27 at the time of his death)

Pearl’s tracks “Mercedes Benz” and her cover of Kris Kristofferson’s “Me and Bobby McGee” had become her trademark songs, with “Me and Bobby McGee” turning out to be her only #1 hit (posthumously) on the Hot 100 the following year.

Janis Joplin’s death may have been early, but her legacy especially in opening doors to future female rock singers, will always be lasting. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995.

 

Useful Janis Joplin links

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